MOOC (Free courses) Students Attracted Most By Course Topics


According to a survey of participants in courses on the Canvas Network,

  • 76% students said they signed up because of the topic,
  • 75% because it was free, 
  • 61% for professional development, and
  • 44% because they wanted to find out what MOOCs are all about. 
  • It turned out that 72% of those who enrolled were themselves professional educators.

Students who enroll in massive open online courses (MOOCs) enroll mostly out of sheer interest in the topic, and when they don’t finish it’s often because life got in the way. The survey, conducted in May and June, polled 1,834 people from the Canvas Network registration database, including 696 who had just enrolled and 1,138 who had completed MOOC courses.

Although not a major motivation at time of enrollment, the study did find that credentials or college credit could increase MOOC completion rates. About two-thirds of respondents said they would be more likely to complete a MOOC that offered a certificate or transferable college credit. About 10% who didn’t complete noted lack of incentive as the main reason. Although the survey didn’t necessarily capture a representative sampling of all those who dropped out, of those who said they did not complete a MOOC, 68% said they got too busy and 20% said they lost interest. “Time is a very valuable commodity, and things do come up. When the course is electronic or virtual, it’s easier to walk away than it would be from an in-person engagement.”

The study also found that only 60% of incoming students planned to participate in MOOC discussion forums, but 72% of those who completed the course wound up engaging in online discussions. Students who were highly engaged in discussions were six times more likely to complete a course, according to the survey. Of the incoming students, 30% had taken a MOOC previously, most commonly with Coursera (81%), followed by another Canvas Network course (36%), an edX course (22%) or one from Udacity (20%). Many were building on prior higher education, meaning a four-year degree (19%), a master’s (37%) or a doctoral degree (11%).

“They tend to be lifelong learners or people who have advanced degrees already,” said Misty Frost, Instructure’s VP of marketing. “They’re people who are interested in learning — and interested in learning interesting things.” If they find that the material is not interesting, it’s easy enough for them to drop the course, she said. Perhaps that’s why the Canvas Network’s number-one course is one on “Gender Through Comic Books.” “It has that edutainment value,” Frost said. Instructure worked with Qualtrics to poll students in an effort to better understand what attracts MOOC students. The LMS provider is in the MOOC business to support its customers who want to experiment with the medium, she said.

Complete List of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) sites

A complete List of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) sites: 

The acronym MOOC stands for massive, open, online course and it’s a term used to describe large numbers of learners coming together in one course to learn in a connected way and providing open access to large population via the internet. MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for the students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). A large number of students and professionals are accessing free educational content through Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) that provides free access to best-in-class education taught by faculty at top universities. Growing internet penetration and MOOC has lowered the entry barriers and encouraging students to access quality education from top universities like Stanford, Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for free.

MOOC providers like Coursera, Udacity and Khan Academy provide new ways to connect, collaborate and share information leading to knowledge sharing process. Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller from Stanford University founded Coursera and it offers over 300 courses from 20 categories including engineering, humanities, medicine and mathematics created by 62 Universities from over 15 countries.

According to Antony Alex, CEO of Rainmaker, “MOOCs can be a great way to supplement formal higher education as well as to gain cross-functional knowledge. It opens up access to quality content thereby democratising higher education.”


List of MOOC Providers in ascending order

  1. 10gen Education 
  2. Academic Earth
  3. Canvas
  4. Class2go-Stanford Online
  5. Class2go-University of Western Australia
  6. Coursera 
  7. CourseSites
  8. Education Portal
  9. edX 
  10. Eliademy
  11. Futurelearn
  12. iDESWEB
  13. iversity 
  14. Khan Academy
  15. MRUniversity 
  16. NovoEd 
  17. Open2Study 
  18. OpenHPI 
  19. OpenLearning  
  20. Open Learning Initiative – Carnegie Mellon Iniversity
  21. OpenUpEd 
  22. P2PU   
  23. Saylor 
  24. Udacity 
  25. Udemy 
  26. Unimooc
  27. UoPeople   
  28. World Education University  
  29. WideWorldEd