List of Courses starting soon in Coursera in August-September 2013


Algorithms, Part I 
08/23/2013 
6 weeks
Calculus One 
08/23/2013 
14 weeks
Disaster Preparedness 
08/26/2013 
6 weeks
Introduction to Sustainability 
08/26/2013 
8 weeks
Survey of Music Technology 
08/26/2013 
6 weeks
Computational Investing, Part I 
08/26/2013 
8 weeks
Microeconomics Principles 
08/26/2013 
16 weeks
Web Intelligence and Big Data 
08/26/2013 
12 weeks
機率 (Probability) 
08/31/2013 
10 weeks
History of Rock, Part One 
09/02/2013 
7 weeks
The Ancient Greeks 
09/02/2013 
7 weeks
Linear and Integer Programming 
09/02/2013 
9 weeks
Networked Life 
09/03/2013 
7 weeks
Vaccines 
09/03/2013 
9 weeks
Dino 101: Dinosaur Paleobiology 
09/04/2013 
12 weeks
Analysis of Algorithms 
09/06/2013 
6 weeks
Economic Issues, Food & You 
09/09/2013 
10 weeks
A History of the World since 1300 
09/16/2013 
12 weeks
Health Informatics in the Cloud 
09/16/2013 
9 weeks
Organizational Analysis 
09/17/2013 
10 weeks
Statistics One 
09/22/2013 
12 weeks


NovoEd


Saberi and co-founder Farnaz Ronaghi, both natives of Iran, started NovoEd in January 2013. The online learning platform that integrates elements of social media was originally developed as an in-house Stanford program called Venture Lab.

NovoEd was originally a Stanford operation called Venture Lab that allowed faculty to put classes online with a platform designed for team projects and collaboration. In January, Saberi took a leave of absence from the university to launch the company with co-founder Farnaz Ronaghi, who was a Ph.D student. “There was so much demand from the outside,” Saberi, a Stanford management and engineering science professor who built the platform over several weekends in 2012, told me. “We also had such rapid growth within Stanford that there was no choice but to spin out.”

The company is backed by Costanoa Ventures, Foundation Capital, Kapor Capital, Learn Capital, Maveron, Ulu Ventures and a number of angel investors. The amount of capital raised is not yet public. Previous online education startups born out of Stanford, Coursera and Udacity, raised $22 million and $21 million, respectively, when they turned their Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) into independent companies.

NovoEd aims to support collaboration among students. Co-founder and CEO Amin Saberi says that it doesn’t matter how many people are part of the lecture aspects of classes but the sweet size for collaborative groups is between 4 and 10 people. Completion rates on NovoEd have been relatively speaking high: 17% of the students who sign up complete a class (and half of those who finish the first assignment also finish the class.)


Since it debuted earlier this year, NovoEd reports that 458,600 students (in 152 countries) have taken its classes. More interesting: NovoEd says that 56,190 project teams have been formed and that they’ve created about 1,500 businesses (or at least a marketing page and pitch deck) via NovoEd.  


NovoEd is also using the data generated by students’ activities to both help match them with the most suitable teammates–and most intriguingly–to improve the assessments of their work. “If you have a submission from a certain [person’s] profile, who would be the right person to match the assignments so they can give the ‘most accurate’ evaluation and feedback,” Saberi says. By “most accurate,” Saberi means an evaluation that most closely corresponds to what the professor (or say, the professor and a small number of top assistants) would be likely to give.


NovoEd offers a mixture of free and fee-based programs. (NovoEd splits any revenue with the course provider). Students can earn certificates of accomplishment.

Click Here to view the courses offered by NovoEd.


MOOC Elements for Corporate learning & development

The following three MOOC elements are particularly well-suited to corporate learning & development:

  • Semi-synchronicity: Most MOOCs allow students to go through the course as a ‘semi-synchronous’ cohort of learners. That means each week the group receives the same assignment of video lectures, readings, quizzes and/or threaded discussions, but each member completes that course work on his or her own time. The design of semi-synchronous cohorts provides learners the opportunity to motivate each other as they go through the program.
  • Course design: “Flipping the classroom,” or swapping classwork with homework, was first made popular by Khan Academy, and is one of the defining features of MOOCs.This way, the most of the learning happens not through a professor lecturing but by giving students access to course materials and having them study and explore them at home. Then in class, they put their new knowledge to work with role-plays, use cases, and exercises.
  • Credentials: Many MOOCs offer college credit or certificates of completion, which help to legitimize and formalize the learning. At leading MOOC providerCoursera, 14 percent of courses offer verified certificates, for which registration costs between $30 and $100 depending on the course’s length and content. Seventy-five different Coursera courses offer verified certificates, through what the company calls its ‘Signature Track,’ and five of those offer college credit eligibility – they include Pre-Calculus and Algebra from UC IrvineCalculus fromUPenn, and from Duke one class on genetics and evolution and another on bioelectricity.In the workplace, certificates function as an incentive for employees to complete optional training or skill development courses, because they’ll have something to show for all their work.

What is a MOOC?

Mooc stands for a massive open online course.

It is an online course aimed at large-scale participation and open access via the internet

They are similar to university courses, but do not tend to offer academic credit

A number of web-based platforms – including edX, Coursera and Udacity – supported by top universities and colleges offer Moocs in a wide range of subjects.

Massive open online courses – threat or opportunity?- From BBC

Can online courses with large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web replace face-to-face teaching in a traditional university setting? Newsnight’s David Grossman examines the rise of massive open online courses (Moocs).

Former US President Bill Clinton said recently the higher education industry needs to undergo a “dramatic change”.


“I think the only sustainable answer is to find a less expensive delivery system,” he said.


The Mooc could just be the answer. The question is, at what cost?


Click here
to read more.

MOOC (Free courses) Students Attracted Most By Course Topics


According to a survey of participants in courses on the Canvas Network,

  • 76% students said they signed up because of the topic,
  • 75% because it was free, 
  • 61% for professional development, and
  • 44% because they wanted to find out what MOOCs are all about. 
  • It turned out that 72% of those who enrolled were themselves professional educators.

Students who enroll in massive open online courses (MOOCs) enroll mostly out of sheer interest in the topic, and when they don’t finish it’s often because life got in the way. The survey, conducted in May and June, polled 1,834 people from the Canvas Network registration database, including 696 who had just enrolled and 1,138 who had completed MOOC courses.

Although not a major motivation at time of enrollment, the study did find that credentials or college credit could increase MOOC completion rates. About two-thirds of respondents said they would be more likely to complete a MOOC that offered a certificate or transferable college credit. About 10% who didn’t complete noted lack of incentive as the main reason. Although the survey didn’t necessarily capture a representative sampling of all those who dropped out, of those who said they did not complete a MOOC, 68% said they got too busy and 20% said they lost interest. “Time is a very valuable commodity, and things do come up. When the course is electronic or virtual, it’s easier to walk away than it would be from an in-person engagement.”

The study also found that only 60% of incoming students planned to participate in MOOC discussion forums, but 72% of those who completed the course wound up engaging in online discussions. Students who were highly engaged in discussions were six times more likely to complete a course, according to the survey. Of the incoming students, 30% had taken a MOOC previously, most commonly with Coursera (81%), followed by another Canvas Network course (36%), an edX course (22%) or one from Udacity (20%). Many were building on prior higher education, meaning a four-year degree (19%), a master’s (37%) or a doctoral degree (11%).

“They tend to be lifelong learners or people who have advanced degrees already,” said Misty Frost, Instructure’s VP of marketing. “They’re people who are interested in learning — and interested in learning interesting things.” If they find that the material is not interesting, it’s easy enough for them to drop the course, she said. Perhaps that’s why the Canvas Network’s number-one course is one on “Gender Through Comic Books.” “It has that edutainment value,” Frost said. Instructure worked with Qualtrics to poll students in an effort to better understand what attracts MOOC students. The LMS provider is in the MOOC business to support its customers who want to experiment with the medium, she said.

Know these points before taking an open Online course (MOOC Tips)

We bring you some tips from an independent blogger before you take up a MOOC Course. Don`t sign up for all the courses that you like.

Let your platter not be more full than what you could take in. Take 1 or 2 courses at a time.

Have a fixed study time just as like we have it the universities ans stick to the schedule. Most of these courses demand 5-7 hours a week. Don`t watch all the 5 lectures at one single stretch. Watch only one video per day and understand the indent of it.

Take notes as you watch the lecture. Pay utmost attention to the lecture as you would do in a traditional course. Sign out from G talk, Facebook and all the other distracting features such as ad`s in the sidebar. Keep all browser tabs closed except the one that is needed. Needless to say, avoid distractions at home/office and keep your cell phone in silent mode.

Participate in the discussion forums. Involve yourself in these discussion forums. I made many friends from many countries through the discussion forums. Ask your questions here, answer other students question. Be kind of others. I have seen lot of rude dominating activities in these discussion forums. Refrain from these kinds of activities and keep in mind that the professor keeps a eye on the discussion forums. Discussion Forums are meant to help others, so keep it clean.

Try honestly to solve the assignments. Here is a warning : If you go through the discussion forums, you will find the answers/solution tips, but avoid doing this. Only if you could not answer/dint understand the questions, go to the discussion forums. The objective is learn by doing, not learn by copying.

Tell to your family, friends and colleagues that you are taking a course. Put it up on your social media websites. This makes you accountable and answerable, hence, you would stay focused on completing the course.

Don`t do the course just for the sake of certificate. The certificate is just a piece of paper and has no real value in market or it will not help you get a promotion or increase the value of your resume. So, focus on learning concepts rather than certificate.



edX MOOC Platform

edX, launched in Fall 2012, is a massive open online course (mooc) platform founded by Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The two institutions have contributed $30 million each to the non-profit project. edX was developed on MITx, a similar project launched by MIT in 2011.

The idea was to offer online university-level courses in a wide range of disciplines to a worldwide audience at no charge. The “learning platform” has been developed as open-source software and made available to other institutions of higher learning that want to make similar offerings. EdX was open sourced on June 1, 2013. There are plans to allow other schools to offer courses on the edX website also. Certificates of successful completion are offered at no cost but not course credit Neither MIT nor Harvard students may take the online courses for credit; they will be used to enrich their learning experience. In addition to educational offerings the project will be used to research learning and distance education.

Seven courses were launched in the initial offering in fall 2012. The design of a viable business model for sustainability of the enterprise is in progress. Now edX offers interactive online classes in subjects including law, history, science, engineering, business, social sciences, computer science, public health, and artificial intelligence (AI).


Website: www.edx.org

Complete List of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) sites

A complete List of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) sites: 

The acronym MOOC stands for massive, open, online course and it’s a term used to describe large numbers of learners coming together in one course to learn in a connected way and providing open access to large population via the internet. MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for the students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). A large number of students and professionals are accessing free educational content through Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) that provides free access to best-in-class education taught by faculty at top universities. Growing internet penetration and MOOC has lowered the entry barriers and encouraging students to access quality education from top universities like Stanford, Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for free.

MOOC providers like Coursera, Udacity and Khan Academy provide new ways to connect, collaborate and share information leading to knowledge sharing process. Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller from Stanford University founded Coursera and it offers over 300 courses from 20 categories including engineering, humanities, medicine and mathematics created by 62 Universities from over 15 countries.

According to Antony Alex, CEO of Rainmaker, “MOOCs can be a great way to supplement formal higher education as well as to gain cross-functional knowledge. It opens up access to quality content thereby democratising higher education.”


List of MOOC Providers in ascending order

  1. 10gen Education 
  2. Academic Earth
  3. Canvas
  4. Class2go-Stanford Online
  5. Class2go-University of Western Australia
  6. Coursera 
  7. CourseSites
  8. Education Portal
  9. edX 
  10. Eliademy
  11. Futurelearn
  12. iDESWEB
  13. iversity 
  14. Khan Academy
  15. MRUniversity 
  16. NovoEd 
  17. Open2Study 
  18. OpenHPI 
  19. OpenLearning  
  20. Open Learning Initiative – Carnegie Mellon Iniversity
  21. OpenUpEd 
  22. P2PU   
  23. Saylor 
  24. Udacity 
  25. Udemy 
  26. Unimooc
  27. UoPeople   
  28. World Education University  
  29. WideWorldEd