List of Courses starting soon in Coursera in August-September 2013


Algorithms, Part I 
08/23/2013 
6 weeks
Calculus One 
08/23/2013 
14 weeks
Disaster Preparedness 
08/26/2013 
6 weeks
Introduction to Sustainability 
08/26/2013 
8 weeks
Survey of Music Technology 
08/26/2013 
6 weeks
Computational Investing, Part I 
08/26/2013 
8 weeks
Microeconomics Principles 
08/26/2013 
16 weeks
Web Intelligence and Big Data 
08/26/2013 
12 weeks
機率 (Probability) 
08/31/2013 
10 weeks
History of Rock, Part One 
09/02/2013 
7 weeks
The Ancient Greeks 
09/02/2013 
7 weeks
Linear and Integer Programming 
09/02/2013 
9 weeks
Networked Life 
09/03/2013 
7 weeks
Vaccines 
09/03/2013 
9 weeks
Dino 101: Dinosaur Paleobiology 
09/04/2013 
12 weeks
Analysis of Algorithms 
09/06/2013 
6 weeks
Economic Issues, Food & You 
09/09/2013 
10 weeks
A History of the World since 1300 
09/16/2013 
12 weeks
Health Informatics in the Cloud 
09/16/2013 
9 weeks
Organizational Analysis 
09/17/2013 
10 weeks
Statistics One 
09/22/2013 
12 weeks


NovoEd


Saberi and co-founder Farnaz Ronaghi, both natives of Iran, started NovoEd in January 2013. The online learning platform that integrates elements of social media was originally developed as an in-house Stanford program called Venture Lab.

NovoEd was originally a Stanford operation called Venture Lab that allowed faculty to put classes online with a platform designed for team projects and collaboration. In January, Saberi took a leave of absence from the university to launch the company with co-founder Farnaz Ronaghi, who was a Ph.D student. “There was so much demand from the outside,” Saberi, a Stanford management and engineering science professor who built the platform over several weekends in 2012, told me. “We also had such rapid growth within Stanford that there was no choice but to spin out.”

The company is backed by Costanoa Ventures, Foundation Capital, Kapor Capital, Learn Capital, Maveron, Ulu Ventures and a number of angel investors. The amount of capital raised is not yet public. Previous online education startups born out of Stanford, Coursera and Udacity, raised $22 million and $21 million, respectively, when they turned their Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) into independent companies.

NovoEd aims to support collaboration among students. Co-founder and CEO Amin Saberi says that it doesn’t matter how many people are part of the lecture aspects of classes but the sweet size for collaborative groups is between 4 and 10 people. Completion rates on NovoEd have been relatively speaking high: 17% of the students who sign up complete a class (and half of those who finish the first assignment also finish the class.)


Since it debuted earlier this year, NovoEd reports that 458,600 students (in 152 countries) have taken its classes. More interesting: NovoEd says that 56,190 project teams have been formed and that they’ve created about 1,500 businesses (or at least a marketing page and pitch deck) via NovoEd.  


NovoEd is also using the data generated by students’ activities to both help match them with the most suitable teammates–and most intriguingly–to improve the assessments of their work. “If you have a submission from a certain [person’s] profile, who would be the right person to match the assignments so they can give the ‘most accurate’ evaluation and feedback,” Saberi says. By “most accurate,” Saberi means an evaluation that most closely corresponds to what the professor (or say, the professor and a small number of top assistants) would be likely to give.


NovoEd offers a mixture of free and fee-based programs. (NovoEd splits any revenue with the course provider). Students can earn certificates of accomplishment.

Click Here to view the courses offered by NovoEd.


Free Online Entrepreneurial Education Courses

 
NovoEd, the Menlo Park-based massive online course program that aims to support social learning, is debuting on August 15 2013 an online entrepreneurship program. Supporting schools are big names in the business school world including Stanford University, Babson College (which has consistently topped the US News & World Report list of “entrepreneurship education” since 1995) and the Kauffman Fellows Academy among others. The program debuts with more than a dozen courses, including “Technology Entrepreneurship” offered in English, Mandarin, and Spanish by Stanford’s Chuck Eesley. Notable by his absence is Stanford’s Steve Blank, who offers his own “How to build a startup” class over at Udacity.

Here is the partial list of courses offered by NovoEd

To know more about the courses offered by NovoEd- Click Here


Massive open online courses – threat or opportunity?- From BBC

Can online courses with large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web replace face-to-face teaching in a traditional university setting? Newsnight’s David Grossman examines the rise of massive open online courses (Moocs).

Former US President Bill Clinton said recently the higher education industry needs to undergo a “dramatic change”.


“I think the only sustainable answer is to find a less expensive delivery system,” he said.


The Mooc could just be the answer. The question is, at what cost?


Click here
to read more.

MOOC (Free courses) Students Attracted Most By Course Topics


According to a survey of participants in courses on the Canvas Network,

  • 76% students said they signed up because of the topic,
  • 75% because it was free, 
  • 61% for professional development, and
  • 44% because they wanted to find out what MOOCs are all about. 
  • It turned out that 72% of those who enrolled were themselves professional educators.

Students who enroll in massive open online courses (MOOCs) enroll mostly out of sheer interest in the topic, and when they don’t finish it’s often because life got in the way. The survey, conducted in May and June, polled 1,834 people from the Canvas Network registration database, including 696 who had just enrolled and 1,138 who had completed MOOC courses.

Although not a major motivation at time of enrollment, the study did find that credentials or college credit could increase MOOC completion rates. About two-thirds of respondents said they would be more likely to complete a MOOC that offered a certificate or transferable college credit. About 10% who didn’t complete noted lack of incentive as the main reason. Although the survey didn’t necessarily capture a representative sampling of all those who dropped out, of those who said they did not complete a MOOC, 68% said they got too busy and 20% said they lost interest. “Time is a very valuable commodity, and things do come up. When the course is electronic or virtual, it’s easier to walk away than it would be from an in-person engagement.”

The study also found that only 60% of incoming students planned to participate in MOOC discussion forums, but 72% of those who completed the course wound up engaging in online discussions. Students who were highly engaged in discussions were six times more likely to complete a course, according to the survey. Of the incoming students, 30% had taken a MOOC previously, most commonly with Coursera (81%), followed by another Canvas Network course (36%), an edX course (22%) or one from Udacity (20%). Many were building on prior higher education, meaning a four-year degree (19%), a master’s (37%) or a doctoral degree (11%).

“They tend to be lifelong learners or people who have advanced degrees already,” said Misty Frost, Instructure’s VP of marketing. “They’re people who are interested in learning — and interested in learning interesting things.” If they find that the material is not interesting, it’s easy enough for them to drop the course, she said. Perhaps that’s why the Canvas Network’s number-one course is one on “Gender Through Comic Books.” “It has that edutainment value,” Frost said. Instructure worked with Qualtrics to poll students in an effort to better understand what attracts MOOC students. The LMS provider is in the MOOC business to support its customers who want to experiment with the medium, she said.

Know these points before taking an open Online course (MOOC Tips)

We bring you some tips from an independent blogger before you take up a MOOC Course. Don`t sign up for all the courses that you like.

Let your platter not be more full than what you could take in. Take 1 or 2 courses at a time.

Have a fixed study time just as like we have it the universities ans stick to the schedule. Most of these courses demand 5-7 hours a week. Don`t watch all the 5 lectures at one single stretch. Watch only one video per day and understand the indent of it.

Take notes as you watch the lecture. Pay utmost attention to the lecture as you would do in a traditional course. Sign out from G talk, Facebook and all the other distracting features such as ad`s in the sidebar. Keep all browser tabs closed except the one that is needed. Needless to say, avoid distractions at home/office and keep your cell phone in silent mode.

Participate in the discussion forums. Involve yourself in these discussion forums. I made many friends from many countries through the discussion forums. Ask your questions here, answer other students question. Be kind of others. I have seen lot of rude dominating activities in these discussion forums. Refrain from these kinds of activities and keep in mind that the professor keeps a eye on the discussion forums. Discussion Forums are meant to help others, so keep it clean.

Try honestly to solve the assignments. Here is a warning : If you go through the discussion forums, you will find the answers/solution tips, but avoid doing this. Only if you could not answer/dint understand the questions, go to the discussion forums. The objective is learn by doing, not learn by copying.

Tell to your family, friends and colleagues that you are taking a course. Put it up on your social media websites. This makes you accountable and answerable, hence, you would stay focused on completing the course.

Don`t do the course just for the sake of certificate. The certificate is just a piece of paper and has no real value in market or it will not help you get a promotion or increase the value of your resume. So, focus on learning concepts rather than certificate.